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05
Oct

David Nicholls in Conversation

David Nicholls talks about his new bestseller 'Sweet Sorrow' in conversation with author Cathy Rentzenbrink.

Town Hall, Cheltenham

Saturday 5th October, 2019 @ 5:00 pm

  • In Conversation
  • Signing
  • Talk

10

About the Event

Very few people write about teenage life as well as David Nicholls. He tells Cathy Rentzenbrink about his new novel, Sweet Sorrow, a tragicomedy about the rocky path to adulthood, the confusion of family life and that brief, searing explosion of first love.

Venue Information

Town Hall
Imperial Square
Cheltenham
GL50 1QA
United Kingdom

About the Book

Sweet Sorrow
Sweet Sorrow

David Nicholls

Publisher:Hodder & Stoughton General Division

Publication date:4 Jul 2019

ISBN:9781444715408

3.84 out of 5
19 reviews
"a road-tested romance"
Financial Times
"humour, poignancy and at least one big, ugly cry"
Red
"interesting, moving, hilarious and sad at the same time"
The Scotsman
"pure joy from start to end"
Woman & Home
"While there’s nothing wrong with the tale of a summer romance, it feels as if Nicholls is playing it safe."
New Statesman
"this new novel will be a publishing event"
The Bookseller
"the One Day author returns with a pitch-perfect romance"
The Daily Telegraph
"the sense of nostalgia is visceral and intense, almost time-bending"
The Sunday Times
"David Nicholls’s arid romance needs a shot of erotic energy"
The Times
"Nicholls is back — but his lovestruck teen struggles to flee the Nineties nostalgia"
Evening Standard

One life-changing summer Charlie meets Fran... In 1997, Charlie Lewis is the kind of boy you don't remember in the school photograph. His exams have not gone well. At home he is looking after his father, when surely it should be the other way round, and if he thinks about the future at all, it is with a kind of dread. Then Fran Fisher bursts into his life and despite himself, Charlie begins to hope. But if Charlie wants to be with Fran, he must take on a challenge that could lose him the respect of his friends and require him to become a different person. He must join the Company. And if the Company sounds like a cult, the truth is even more appalling. The price of hope, it seems, is Shakespeare.